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Childhood and adolescent psychotic experiences and risk of mental disorder: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

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posted on 24.03.2020 by Colm Healy, Ross Brannigan, Niamh Dooley, Helen Coughlan, Mary Clarke, Ian Kelleher, Mary Cannon

BACKGROUND:

Psychotic experiences (PEs) are common in childhood and adolescence and their association with mental disorders is well-established. We aim to conduct a quantitative synthesis the literature on the relationship between childhood and adolescent PEs and (i) any mental disorder; and (ii) specific categories of mental disorder, while stratifying by study design.

METHOD:

Three electronic databases (PUBMED, PsycINFO and EMBASE) were searched from inception to August 2017 for all the published literature on childhood and adolescent PEs and mental disorder (outcome) in non-help-seeking community samples. Study quality was assessed using a recognised quality assessment tool for observational studies. Two authors conducted independent data extraction. Pooled odds ratios were calculated for mental disorders using random-effects models. Additional analyses were conducted investigating different categories of mental disorder while stratifying by study design.

RESULTS:

Fourteen studies from 13 community samples (n = 29 517) were identified with 9.8% of participants reporting PEs. PEs were associated with a three-fold increased risk of any mental disorder [odds ratio (OR) 3.08, confidence interval (CI) 2.26-4.21, k = 12]. PEs were associated with four-fold increase risk of psychotic disorder (OR 3.96, CI 2.03-7.73, population-attributable-fraction: 23.2%, k = 5). In addition, PEs were associated with an increased risk of affective disorders, anxiety disorders, behavioural disorders and substance-use disorders. Few longitudinal studies have investigated childhood and adolescent PEs and subsequent non-psychotic disorders which limited a meaningful synthesis and interpretation of these results.

CONCLUSION:

This meta-analysis confirms that PEs are prevalent in childhood and adolescent community samples and are associated with a variety of mental disorders beyond psychotic disorders. Further longitudinal research is necessary to fully determine the longitudinal relationship between PEs and non-psychotic disorders.

Funding

European Research Council Consolidator Award to M Cannon (Grant Code 724809 iHEAR)

Health Research Board Award (HRAPHR- 2015-1323)

History

Comments

This article has been published in a revised form in Psychological Medicine https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033291719000485. This version is free to view and download for private research and study only. Not for re-distribution, re-sale

Published Citation

Healy C, Brannigan R, Dooley N, Coughlan H, Clarke M, Kelleher I, Cannon M. Childhood and adolescent psychotic experiences and risk of mental disorder: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Psychological Medicine. 2019;49(10):1589-1599

Publication Date

15/05/2019

Publisher

Cambridge University Press

PubMed ID

31088578

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