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Auditory hallucinations in the population: what do they mean and what should we do about them?

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journal contribution
posted on 22.11.2019, 17:14 by Ian Kelleher

There has been a dramatic surge in research on auditory hallucinations over the past 15 years. Of the more than 100 papers identified in a recent meta-analysis of studies on definition, description and causes of auditory hallucinations (1), greater than 90% were published since the year 2000. This glut of publications points to an upheaval that has taken place in psychiatry. Simply put, there has been a paradigm shift: a movement away from the Schneiderian view of auditory hallucinations as (predominantly) symptoms of psychotic disorder, towards an increasingly accepted view that these are experiences that occur in the full range of mental disorders and, indeed, none.

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This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: Kelleher I. Auditory hallucinations in the population: what do they mean and what should we do about them? Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica. 2016;134(1):3-5, which has been published in final form at DOI: 10.1111/acps.12599. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving."

Published Citation

Kelleher I. Auditory hallucinations in the population: what do they mean and what should we do about them? Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica. 2016;134(1):3-5.

Publication Date

01/01/2016

Publisher

Munksgaard International Publishers

PubMed ID

27282305

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