A Systematic Review Protocol of the Barriers to Both Physical Activity and Obesity Counselling in the Secondary Care Setting as Reported by Healthcare Providers.pdf (297.15 kB)

A systematic review protocol of the barriers to both physical activity and obesity counselling in the secondary care setting as reported by healthcare providers

Download (297.15 kB)
journal contribution
posted on 14.06.2021, 08:02 by Jaishri Sooknarine-Rajpatty, Austin B. Auyeung, Frank Doyle
Physical activity and obesity counselling have both been gaining increasing interest in preventive health and treatment. However, most healthcare professionals do not provide advice on these topics nearly as often as they should. There are many reasons for this. Common barriers for the provision of brief advice on physical activity and obesity in both primary and secondary care are lack of time, motivation and knowledge. Systematic reviews have been published on the barriers of physical activity and obesity counselling in the primary care setting, but there is no published work on the barriers present in secondary care. This systematic review aims to assess all published data that discuss the barriers of physical activity and obesity counselling as noted by healthcare providers in secondary care. Four databases will be searched using the same search strategy, and the findings will be compiled using the COM-B model to explore the frequency of a reported barrier. This systematic review will be beneficial not only to practicing healthcare providers, but also the educational and managerial staff of secondary care facilities, as it may highlight the need for further training to fill gaps in the provision of preventive healthcare.

History

Comments

This article is available at www.mdpi.com

Published Citation

Sooknarine-Rajpatty J, Auyeung AB, Doyle F. A systematic review protocol of the barriers to both physical activity and obesity counselling in the secondary care setting as reported by healthcare providers. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020;17(4):1195

Publication Date

13 February 2020

PubMed ID

32069914

Department/Unit

  • Health Psychology
  • Undergraduate Research

Research Area

  • Population Health and Health Services

Publisher

MDPI AG

Version

  • Published Version (Version of Record)