Burnout Prevalence and Its Associated Factors among Malaysian Healthcare Workers during COVID-19 Pandemic. An Embedded Mixed-Method Study.pdf (290.01 kB)
Download file

Burnout prevalence and its associated factors among Malaysian healthcare workers during COVID-19 pandemic: an embedded mixed-method study

Download (290.01 kB)
journal contribution
posted on 02.03.2022, 16:24 authored by Nurhanis Syazni Roslan, Muhamad Saiful Bahri Yusoff, Ab Razak Asrenee, Karen MorganKaren Morgan
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has become a global health threat and has placed an extraordinary demand on healthcare workers around the world. In this study, we aim to examine the prevalence of burnout and its associated factors and experience among Malaysian healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic through an embedded mixed-method study design. We found that more than half of Malaysian healthcare workers in this sample experienced burnout. Direct involvement in COVID-19 screening or treatment, having a medical condition, and less psychological support in the workplace emerged to be the significant factors in personal-, work-, and patient-related burnout. Participants described their workloads, uncertainties caused by the pandemic, challenging work-family balance, and stretched workplace relationships as the sources of burnout. Exhaustion appeared to be the major symptom, and many participants utilized problem-focused coping to deal with the adversities experienced during the pandemic. Participants reported physical-, occupational-, psychological-, and social-related negative impacts resulting from burnout. As the pandemic trajectory is yet unknown, these findings provide early insight and guidance for possible interventions.

History

Comments

The original article is available at https://www.mdpi.com/

Published Citation

Roslan NS, Yusoff MSB, Asrenee AR, Morgan K. Burnout prevalence and its associated factors among Malaysian healthcare workers during COVID-19 pandemic: an embedded mixed-method study. Healthcare (Basel). 2021;9(1):90

Publication Date

17 January 2021

PubMed ID

33477380

Department/Unit

  • Health Psychology

Publisher

MDPI AG

Version

  • Published Version (Version of Record)