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Calcium transport and signalling in breast cancer: functional and prognostic significance

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journal contribution
posted on 05.08.2021, 11:09 by Shane O'Grady, Maria MorganMaria Morgan
Comprised of a complex network of numerous intertwining pathways, the Ca2+ signalling nexus is an essential mediator of many normal cellular activities. Like many other such functions, the normal physiological activity of Ca2+ signalling is frequently co-opted and reshaped in cases of breast cancer, creating a potent oncogenic drive within the affected cell population. Such modifications can occur within pathways mediating either Ca2+ import (e.g. TRP channels, ORAI-STIM1) or Ca2+ export (e.g. PMCA), indicating that both increases and decreases within cellular Ca2+ levels have the potential to increase the malignant potential of a cell. Increased understanding of these pathways may offer clinical benefit in terms of both prognosis and treatment; patient survival has been linked to expression levels of certain Ca2+ transport proteins, whilst selective targeting of these factors with novel anti-cancer agents has demonstrated a variety of anti-tumour effects in in vitro studies. In addition, the activity of several Ca2+ signalling pathways has been shown to influence chemotherapy response, suggesting that a synergistic approach coupling traditional chemotherapy with Ca2+ targeting agents may also improve patient outcome. As such, targeted modulation of these pathways represents a novel approach in precision medicine and breast cancer therapy.

Funding

Breast Cancer Now grant 2013NovPhD147

History

Comments

The original article is available at https://www.sciencedirect.com

Published Citation

O'Grady S, Morgan MP. Calcium transport and signalling in breast cancer: Functional and prognostic significance. Semin Cancer Biol. 2021;72:19-26.

Publication Date

19 December 2019

PubMed ID

31866475

Department/Unit

  • School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences

Research Area

  • Health Professions Education
  • Cancer
  • Biomaterials and Regenerative Medicine

Publisher

Elsevier

Version

  • Accepted Version (Postprint)