Cytokine responses to Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection.pdf (899.39 kB)
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Cytokine responses to Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection differ between patient cohorts that have different clinical courses of infection.

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posted on 21.12.2021, 17:02 authored by Sinead McNicholas, Alida TalentoAlida Talento, Joanne O Gorman, Margaret M. Hannan, Maureen Lynch, Catherine GreeneCatherine Greene, Hilary HumphreysHilary Humphreys, Deirdre Fitzgerald HughesDeirdre Fitzgerald Hughes

BackgroundThe clinical course of Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection is unpredictable and bacterial virulence, host immune response and patient characteristics are among the factors that contribute to the clinical course of infection. To investigate the relationship between cytokine response and clinical outcome, circulating cytokine levels were investigated in response to S. aureus bloodstream infection in patient with different clinical courses of infection.MethodsA prospective study was carried out in 61 patients with S. aureus bloodstream infection and circulating levels of IL-6, GRO-¿, RANTES and leptin were assessed over the course of the infection. Levels were compared in patients with complicated courses of infection (e.g. infective endocarditis) versus uncomplicated courses of S. aureus bloodstream infection and methicillin-resistant S. aureus Vs methicillin-susceptible S. aureus infection.ResultsSignificantly lower leptin levels (p¿

Funding

Pfizer Ireland

History

Comments

The original article is available at www.biomedcentral.com

Published Citation

McNicholas S, Talento A, O Gorman J, Hannan MM, Lynch M, Greene CM, Humphreys H, Fitzgerald-Hughes D. Cytokine responses to Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection differ between patient cohorts that have different clinical courses of infection. BMC Infectious Diseases. 2014;14(1):580.

Publication Date

2014-11-15

PubMed ID

25398383

Department/Unit

  • Beaumont Hospital
  • Clinical Microbiology
  • Medicine