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Exploring the multidimensional relationship between medication beliefs and adherence to medications among older adults living with multimorbidity using polynomial regression: an observational cohort study

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Version 2 2023-07-20, 09:08
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journal contribution
posted on 2023-07-20, 09:08 authored by Louise Foley, Ann S Doherty, Emma WallaceEmma Wallace, Fiona BolandFiona Boland, Lisa Hynes, Andrew W Murphy, Gerard J Molloy

Background

People living with multimorbidity may hold complex beliefs about medicines, potentially influencing adherence. Polynomial regression offers a novel approach to examining the multidimensional relationship between medication beliefs and adherence, overcoming limitations associated with difference scores.

Purpose

To explore the multidimensional relationship between medication beliefs and adherence among people living with multimorbidity.

Methods

Secondary analysis was conducted using observational data from a cohort of older adults living with ≥2 chronic conditions, recruited from 15 family practices in Ireland in 2010 (n = 812) and followed up in 2012 (n = 515). Medication beliefs were measured with the Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire-Specific. Adherence was assessed with the medication possession ratio using prescription data from the national primary care reimbursement service. Polynomial regression was used to explore the best-fitting multidimensional models for the relationship between (i) beliefs and adherence at baseline, and (ii) beliefs at baseline and adherence at follow-up.

Results

Confirmatory polynomial regression rejected the difference-score model, and exploratory polynomial regression indicated quadratic models for both analyses. Reciprocal effects were present in both analyses (slope [Analysis 1]: β = 0.08, p = .007; slope [Analysis 2]: β = 0.07, p = .044), indicating that adherence was higher when necessity beliefs were high and concern beliefs were low. Nonreciprocal effects were also present in both analyses (slope [Analysis 1]: β = 0.05, p = .006; slope [Analysis 2]: β = 0.04, p = .043), indicating that adherence was higher when both necessity and concern beliefs were high.

Conclusions

Among people living with multimorbidity, there is evidence that the relationship between medication beliefs and adherence is multidimensional. Attempts to support adherence should consider the combined role of necessity and concern beliefs.

Funding

Health Research Board Ireland Collaborative Doctoral Award (CDA2018-003)

Health Research Board Center for Primary Care Research (HRC/2007/1)

History

Comments

The original article is available at https://academic.oup.com/

Published Citation

Foley L. et al. Exploring the multidimensional relationship between medication beliefs and adherence to medications among older adults living with multimorbidity using polynomial regression: an observational cohort study. Ann Behav Med. 2023;57(7):561-570

Publication Date

31 March 2023

PubMed ID

37000216

Department/Unit

  • Data Science Centre
  • HRB Centre for Primary Care Research
  • General Practice

Research Area

  • Population Health and Health Services

Publisher

Oxford University Press (OUP)

Version

  • Published Version (Version of Record)