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Morally injurious events and post-traumatic embitterment disorder in UK health and social care professionals during COVID-19: a cross-sectional web survey

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journal contribution
posted on 11.05.2022, 14:42 by Chloe J Brennan, Michael McKay, Jon C Cole
Objective: To estimate the prevalence and predictors of morally injurious events (MIEs) and post-traumatic embitterment disorder (PTED) in UK health and social care professionals during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Design: Cross-sectional study.
Setting: September-October 2020 in the UK. Online survey hosted on Qualtrics, and recruited through Prolific.
Participants: 400 health and social care workers, aged 18 or above and living and working in the UK during the pandemic.
Main outcome measures: MIEs were assessed using the Moral Injury Events Scale and PTED was assessed using the PTED self-rating scale. Potential predictors were measured using surveys of exposure to occupational stressors, optimism, self-esteem, resilient coping style, consideration of future consequences and personal belief in a just world.
Results: 19% of participants displayed clinical levels of PTED, and 73% experienced at least one COVID-related MIE. Exposure to occupational stressors increased the risk of experiencing PTED and MIEs, whereas personal belief in a procedurally just world, which is the belief that they experienced fair processes, was a protective mechanism.
Conclusions: MIEs and PTED are being experienced by UK health and social care professionals, particularly in those exposed to work-related stressors.

Funding

Economic and Social Research Council UK (ES/ P000665/1)

COVID-19 strategic funding from the University of Liverpool

History

Comments

The original article is available at https://bmjopen.bmj.com/

Published Citation

Brennan CJ, McKay MT, Cole JC. Morally injurious events and post-traumatic embitterment disorder in UK health and social care professionals during COVID-19: a cross-sectional web survey. BMJ Open. 2022;12(5):e054062.

Publication Date

6 May 2022

PubMed ID

35523494

Department/Unit

  • Health Psychology

Publisher

BMJ Publishing Group Ltd

Version

  • Published Version (Version of Record)