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Prevalence and associated risk factors for suicidal ideation, non-suicidal self-injury and suicide attempt among male construction workers in Ireland

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journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-11, 14:12 authored by Shane O’Donnell, Tom Egan, Nicholas ClarkeNicholas Clarke, Noel Richardson

Background: Suicide among male construction workers are reported to be disproportionally high compared to the working age population. However, there is minimal understanding of the prevalence and associated factors for suicidal ideation, non-suicidal self-injury, and suicide attempt among this occupational group globally.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on a large sample of male construction workers in Ireland (n = 1,585). We investigated the prevalence of suicidal ideation, non-suicidal self-injury and suicide attempts and sociodemographic, occupational, and mental health factors associated with these three outcomes. Multivariable Poisson regression was performed to estimate the prevalence rate ratio of suicidal ideation (model 1 primary outcome), while multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratio of non-suicidal self-injury (model 2 primary outcome), and suicide attempt (model 3 primary outcome).

Results: The lifetime prevalence rate for suicidal ideation was 22%, 6% for non-suicidal self-injury, and 6% for suicide attempt. In univariate modelling, socio-demographic and occupation-specific factors associated with the three outcomes included younger age (suicidal ideation and non-suicidal self-injury), not being in a relationship (suicide attempt) and working 35-44 h per week (suicidal ideation and suicide attempt). The mental health factors generalized anxiety disorder, depression, and suicide bereavement were significantly associated with increased risk of the three outcomes. In fully adjusted multivariable models, increasing severity of generalized anxiety disorder and depression were associated with an increased prevalence rate ratio of suicidal ideation, and a higher odds ratio of non-suicidal self-injury and suicide attempt.

Conclusion: Suicidal ideation, non-suicidal self-injury and suicide attempt are significant issues for male construction workers that require specific attention. Findings highlight a need to support younger male construction workers and those bereaved by suicide. They also highlight the need for the early detection and treatment of generalized anxiety disorder and depression in order to intervene in, and potentially prevent, suicidality among male construction workers.

Funding

National Office for Suicide Prevention in Ireland

History

Data Availability Statement

The datasets used and/or analyzed during the current study are available from the corresponding author on reasonable request.

Comments

The original article is available at https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/

Published Citation

O'Donnell S, Egan T, Clarke N, Richardson N. Prevalence and associated risk factors for suicidal ideation, non-suicidal self-injury and suicide attempt among male construction workers in Ireland. BMC Public Health. 2024;24(1):1263.

Publication Date

8 May 2024

PubMed ID

38720265

Department/Unit

  • School of Population Health

Research Area

  • Cancer
  • Population Health and Health Services

Publisher

Springer Science and Business Media LLC

Version

  • Published Version (Version of Record)