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Prevalence and psychopathologic significance of hallucinations in individuals with a history of seizures

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posted on 02.02.2022, 16:55 authored by Kathryn YatesKathryn Yates, Ulla Lång, Jordan DeVylder, Mary ClarkeMary Clarke, Fiona McNicholas, Mary CannonMary Cannon, Hans Oh, Ian KelleherIan Kelleher

Objective: A relationship between seizure activity and hallucinations is well established. The psychopathologic significance of hallucinations in individuals with seizures, however, is unclear. In this study, we assessed the prevalence of auditory and visual hallucinations in individuals who reported a seizure history and investigated their relationship with a number of mental disorders, suicidal ideation, and suicide attempts.

Methods: Data were from the "Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey," a population-based cross-sectional survey. Auditory and visual hallucinations were assessed using the Psychosis Screening Questionnaire. Mental health disorders were assessed using the Clinical Interview Schedule. Logistic regressions assessed relationships between hallucinatory experiences and mental disorders, suicidal ideation, and suicide attempts.

Results: A total of 14 812 adults (58% female; mean [standard error of the mean; SEM] age 51.8 [0.15]) completed the study; 1.39% reported having ever had seizures (54% female), and 8% of individuals with a seizure history reported hallucinatory experiences (odds ratio [OR] 2.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.24-3.38). Individuals with seizures had an increased odds of having any mental disorder (OR 2.34, 95% CI 1.73-3.16), suicidal ideation (OR 2.38, 95% CI 1.77-3.20), and suicide attempt (OR 4.15, 95% CI 2.91-5.92). Compared to individuals with seizures who did not report hallucinatory experiences, individuals with seizures who reported hallucinatory experiences had an increased odds of any mental disorder (OR 3.47, 95% CI 1.14-10.56), suicidal ideation (OR 2.58, 95% CI 0.87-7.63), and suicide attempt (OR 4.61, 95% CI 1.56-13.65). Overall, more than half of individuals with a seizure history who reported hallucinatory experiences had at least one suicide attempt. Adjusting for psychopathology severity did not account for the relationship between hallucinatory experiences and suicide attempts.

Significance: Hallucinatory experiences in individuals with seizures are markers of high risk for mental health disorders and suicidal behavior. There is a particularly strong relationship between hallucinations and suicide attempts in individuals with seizures. Clinicians working with individuals with seizures should routinely ask about hallucinatory experiences.

Funding

Health Research Award HRA-PHR-2015-1130 from the Health Research Board (Ireland)

Irish Research Council award COALESCE/2019/61

European Research Council Consolidator Award (iHEAR Grant number 724809)

RCSI StAR programme

History

Comments

This is the peer reviewed version of the following article:, Yates K. et al. Prevalence and psychopathologic significance of hallucinations in individuals with a history of seizures. Epilepsia. 2020;61(7):1464-1471, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/epi.16570 This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving

Published Citation

Yates K. et al. Prevalence and psychopathologic significance of hallucinations in individuals with a history of seizures. Epilepsia. 2020;61(7):1464-1471

Publication Date

10 June 2020

PubMed ID

32524599

Department/Unit

  • Beaumont Hospital
  • Health Psychology
  • Psychiatry

Research Area

  • Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders
  • Population Health and Health Services

Publisher

Wiley

Version

  • Accepted Version (Postprint)