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Prognostic tools and candidate drugs based on plasma proteomics of patients with severe COVID-19 complications

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journal contribution
posted on 09.03.2022, 16:56 authored by Maryam A Y Al-Nesf, Houari B Abdesselem, Ilham Bensmail, Shahd Ibrahim, Walaa A H Saeed, Sara S I Mohammed, Almurtada Razok, Hashim Alhussain, Reham M A Aly, Muna Al Maslamani, Khalid Ouararhni, Mohamad Y Khatib, Ali Ait Hssain, Ali S Omrani, Saad Al-Kaabi, Abdullatif Al Khal, Asmaa A Al-Thani, Waseem Samsam, Abdulaziz Farooq, Jassim Al-Suwaidi, Mohammed Al-Maadheed, Heba H Al-Siddiqi, Alexandra E Butler, Julie V Decock, Vidya Mohamed-Ali, Fares Al-Ejeh
COVID-19 complications still present a huge burden on healthcare systems and warrant predictive risk models to triage patients and inform early intervention. Here, we profile 893 plasma proteins from 50 severe and 50 mild-moderate COVID-19 patients, and 50 healthy controls, and show that 375 proteins are differentially expressed in the plasma of severe COVID-19 patients. These differentially expressed plasma proteins are implicated in the pathogenesis of COVID-19 and present targets for candidate drugs to prevent or treat severe complications. Based on the plasma proteomics and clinical lab tests, we also report a 12-plasma protein signature and a model of seven routine clinical tests that validate in an independent cohort as early risk predictors of COVID-19 severity and patient survival. The risk predictors and candidate drugs described in our study can be used and developed for personalized management of SARS-CoV-2 infected patients.

Funding

Hamad Medical Corporation (fund number MRC-05-003)

Qatar Biomedical Research Institute (QBRI)

History

Comments

The original article is available at https://www.nature.com/

Published Citation

Al-Nesf MAY, et al. Prognostic tools and candidate drugs based on plasma proteomics of patients with severe COVID-19 complications. Nat Commun. 2022;13(1):946.

Publication Date

17 February 2022

PubMed ID

35177642

Department/Unit

  • RCSI Bahrain

Publisher

Springer Nature

Version

  • Published Version (Version of Record)