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Relative infectiousness of asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infected persons compared with symptomatic individuals: a rapid scoping review

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posted on 16.03.2022, 15:29 authored by David McevoyDavid Mcevoy, Conor McAloon, Aine Collins, Kevin Hunt, Francis Butler, Andrew Bryne, Miriam Casey-Bryars, Ann Barber, John Griffin, Elizabeth Ann Lane, Patrick Wall, Simon John More
Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the relative infectiousness of asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infected persons compared with symptomatic individuals based on a scoping review of available literature.
Design: Rapid scoping review of peer-reviewed literature from 1 January to 5 December 2020 using the LitCovid database and the Cochrane library.
Setting: International studies on the infectiousness of individuals infected with SARS-CoV-2.
Participants: Studies were selected for inclusion if they defined asymptomatics as a separate cohort distinct from presymptomatics and if they provided a quantitative measure of the infectiousness of asymptomatics relative to symptomatics.
Primary outcome measures: PCR result (PCR studies), the rate of infection (mathematical modelling studies) and secondary attack rate (contact tracing studies) - in each case from asymptomatic in comparison with symptomatic individuals.
Results: There are only a limited number of published studies that report estimates of relative infectiousness of asymptomatic compared with symptomatic individuals. 12 studies were included after the screening process. Significant differences exist in the definition of infectiousness. PCR studies in general show no difference in shedding levels between symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals; however, the number of study subjects is generally limited. Two modelling studies estimate relative infectiousness to be 0.43 and 0.57, but both of these were more reflective of the infectiousness of undocumented rather than asymptomatic cases. The results from contact tracing studies include estimates of relative infectiousness of 0, but with insufficient evidence to conclude that it is significantly different from 1.
Conclusions: There is considerable heterogeneity in estimates of relative infectiousness highlighting the need for further investigation of this important parameter. It is not possible to provide any conclusive estimate of relative infectiousness, as the estimates from the reviewed studies varied between 0 and 1.

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The original article is available at https://bmjopen.bmj.com/

Published Citation

McEvoy D, et al. Relative infectiousness of asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infected persons compared with symptomatic individuals: a rapid scoping review. BMJ Open. 2021;11(5):e042354.

Publication Date

4 May 2021

PubMed ID

33947725

Department/Unit

  • Public Health and Epidemiology

Publisher

BMJ Publishing Group Ltd

Version

  • Published Version (Version of Record)