Self-reported interpersonal and educational.vocational difficulties in young adults with a history of transient psychotic experiences. findings from a population-based study.pdf (799.82 kB)
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Self-reported interpersonal and educational/vocational difficulties in young adults with a history of transient psychotic experiences: findings from a population-based study

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posted on 28.01.2022, 16:33 authored by Helen CoughlanHelen Coughlan, Erin Walton-Ball, Eleanor Carey, Colm HealyColm Healy, Grace O’Regan-Murphy, Aoife Nic Uidhir, Mary ClarkeMary Clarke, Mary CannonMary Cannon

Background: Psychotic experiences (PEs) are not uncommon in young people and are associated with both psychopathology and compromised global functioning. Although psychotic experiences are transient (short-lived, self-resolving and non-recurring) for most people who report them, few studies have examined the association between early transient PEs and later functioning in population samples. Additionally, studies using self-report measures of interpersonal and educational/ vocational difficulties are lacking. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between transient psychotic experiences and self-reported interpersonal and educational/vocational difficulties in adolescence and young adulthood.

Methods: Participants were 103 young people from a longitudinal population-based study cohort of mental health in Ireland. They attended for baseline clinical interviews in childhood (age 11-13) and were followed up in young adulthood (age 19-25). Participants who reported psychotic experiences at baseline but not at follow-up were classified as having transient psychotic experiences. Data from both time-points were used to examine the association between transient psychotic experiences and self-reported interpersonal and educational/ vocational difficulties in young adulthood using poisson regression modelling.

Results: Young people with a history of transient psychotic experiences reported significantly higher interpersonal (adj IRR: 1.83, 95%ileCI: 1.10-3.02, p = .02) and educational/vocational (adj IRR: 2.28, 95%ileCI: 1.43-3.64, p = .001) difficulties during adolescence. However, no significant differences in interpersonal (adj IRR: 0.49, 95%ileCI: 0.10-2.30, p = .37) or educational/vocational (adj IRR: 0.88, 95%ileCI: 0.37-2.08, p = .77) difficulties were found in young adulthood. Self-reported interpersonal and educational/vocational difficulties in young people both with and without a history of transient psychotic experiences decreased between adolescence and young adulthood.

Conclusions: Young people with transient psychotic experiences have increased interpersonal and educational/vocational difficulties in adolescence but these may not persist into the young adult years. This finding indicates that early psychotic experiences may not confer high risk for long-term interpersonal or educational/vocational deficits among young people who experience these phenomena transiently.

Funding

European Research Council Consolidator Award (iHEAR; Grant number 724809)

Health Research Board Fellowship (HPF-2015-974)

Science Foundation Ireland

Health Research Board Health Research Award (HRA-PHR-2015-1130)

Irish Research Council Award (COALESCE/2019/61)

History

Comments

The original article is available at https://bmcpsychiatry.biomedcentral.com/

Published Citation

Coughlan H. et al. Self-reported interpersonal and educational/vocational difficulties in young adults with a history of transient psychotic experiences: findings from a population-based study. BMC Psychiatry. 2021;21(1):30

Publication Date

11 January 2021

PubMed ID

33430829

Department/Unit

  • Beaumont Hospital
  • Health Psychology
  • Psychiatry

Research Area

  • Population Health and Health Services
  • Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders

Publisher

BioMed Central

Version

  • Published Version (Version of Record)