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The 2019 neuro-rehabilitation implementation framework in Ireland: challenges for implementation and the implications for people with brain injuries

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journal contribution
posted on 04.11.2021, 17:19 authored by Sara Burke, Grainne McGettrick, Karen Foley, Manjula ManikandanManjula Manikandan, Sarah Barry
In 2019, eight years after the publication of Ireland's first neuro-rehabilitation strategy, an implementation framework was published. This paper describes and assesses the Irish health policy journey to the publication of the 2019 Implementation Framework with a particular focus on tracking the rehabilitation needs of people with acquired brain injury (ABI). Internationally, rehabilitation services are a low priority for governments, with policy makers having limited knowledge and understanding of rehabilitation. This low political priority and policy understanding contributes to under-developed and poorly co-ordinated services for people who need neuro-rehabilitation services, including people with Acquired Brain Injury (ABI). Despite the publication of the 2019 neuro-rehabilitation implementation framework, key challenges remain for people with ABI in Ireland, including the absence of services across the ‘pathway’, the under-resourcing of specialist rehabilitation services, the impact on the lives of people with brain injury of poor or no access to services, and the lack of good data on this population. The paper concludes with recommendations on how increased political priority of the rehabilitation needs of people with ABI could enhance implementation of the neuro-rehabilitation implementation framework.

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Comments

The original article is available at https://www.sciencedirect.com

Published Citation

Burke S, McGettrick G, Foley K, Manikandan M, Barry S. The 2019 neuro-rehabilitation implementation framework in Ireland: challenges for implementation and the implications for people with brain injuries. Health Policy. 2020;124(3):225-230.

Publication Date

9 January 2020

PubMed ID

31964508

Department/Unit

  • Public Health and Epidemiology

Research Area

  • Population Health and Health Services

Publisher

Elsevier

Version

  • Published Version (Version of Record)