Riyad El-Moslemany Jun'20.pdf (1.45 MB)
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Risk Factors for Intimate Partner Violence in Asylum Seeking and Refugee Populations: A Systematic Review

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thesis
posted on 13.12.2021, 16:19 authored by Riyad Elmoslemany
Background: Intimate partner violence is a serious public health problem. Asylum seekers and refugees are marginalised populations that are vulnerable to violence in general and may be vulnerable to intimate partner violence (IPV) in particular. More research exists on risk factors for IPV in the general population than in asylum seeking and refugee populations. Evidence is emerging that the prevalence of IPV in these populations is high but risk factors for IPV within these populations have yet to be established. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to review IPV in asylum seeking and refugee populations. The aim and objective of this thesis is to identify risk factors for intimate partner violence in asylum seeking and refugee populations through systematic review and narrative synthesis of the literature.
Methods: PubMed, Web of Science, SCOPUS, Embase, Global Health, PsycINFO, Westlaw and Social Science Research Network electronic databases were searched. Grey literature databases, agency websites and bibliographic citations were also searched. Studies were selected according to a population, exposure and outcome framework. Adult asylum seekers and refugees that had crossed an international border were included. Any quantitative observational study on risk factors for IPV was eligible for inclusion. Data were extracted across six domains; study details, methods, exposure, outcome, analysis and results. Studies were critically appraised with the Joanna Briggs Institute SUMARI tool and quality assessed according to the GRADE approach. Meta-analysis was not possible due to multiple heterogeneity types.
Results: A complex multitude of risk factors for IPV in asylum seeking and refugee populations was found. Narrative synthesis of 23 studies revealed an inverse association between both perpetrator and victim education level and IPV, with lower levels of education being associated with higher levels of IPV. Relationship factors, legal status and age were also important risk factors for IPV. The majority of studies had a cross-sectional design. Heterogeneity in definitions of IPV, sample, methods, statistical procedures and outcomes was uncovered.
Conclusions: Low education level is a potentially modifiable risk factor for IPV in asylum seeking and refugee populations. There is a dearth of high quality rigorous research in this area. Future research needs more consistency particularly regarding definitions of IPV. Multiple stakeholders could use the results of this review to help these populations and address the insidious problem of intimate partner

History

First Supervisor

Prof. Samuel McConkey

Second Supervisor

Dr Lisa Mellon

Comments

Submitted for the Award of Masters of Science: Research to the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, 2020

Published Citation

El-Moslemany R,. Risk Factors for Intimate Partner Violence in Asylum Seeking and Refugee Populations: A Systematic Review [MSc thesis] Dublin: Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland; 2020

Degree Name

Master of Science (MSc): Research

Date of award

31/05/2020

Programme

  • Master of Science (MSc): Research