Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland
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Melissa Sharp

Senior Postdoctoral Fellow (Health sciences; Economics; Education; Psychology)

Dublin, Ireland

I am an epidemiologist with expertise in meta-research and observational mixed-methods designs. My current work focuses on clinical guideline development, science communication, and evidence synthesis methods. In 2020, I earned a joint doctorate in Epidemiology from the University of Paris and University of Split, as a part of the Methods in Research on Research (MiRoR) Project, an international consortium dedicated to reducing waste in research. During my time as a Marie Skłodowska-Curie doctoral research fellow, I investigated how reporting guidelines for observational studies (STROBE and its extensions) were being used by authors and journals. I also hold a Masters in Public Health in Epidemiology with a Graduate Certificate in Public Health Informatics from Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, and a Bachelor of Science in Psychology with a Minor in Women and Gender Studies from Michigan State University.

Publications

  • Disorders of sex development peer support.
  • Ocrelizumab in Primary Progressive and Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis.
  • Interdisciplinary care in disorders/differences of sex development (DSD): The psychosocial component of the DSD-Translational research network
  • The STROBE extensions: protocol for a qualitative assessment of content and a survey of endorsement
  • Dissemination of 2014 dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) trial results: a systematic review of scholarly and media attention over 7 months
  • Every ROSE has its thorns
  • The STROBE Extensions: Considerations for Development
  • A cross-sectional bibliometric study showed suboptimal journal endorsement rates of STROBE and its extensions
  • Disorders of sex development peer support
  • Psychosocial Screening in Disorders/Differences of Sex Development: Psychometric Evaluation of the Psychosocial Assessment Tool
  • From the theoretical to the practical: how to evaluate the ethical and scientific justifications of randomized clinical trials
  • Usefulness of applying research reporting guidelines as Writing Aid software: a crossover randomised controlled trial
  • Using preprints in evidence synthesis: Commentary on experience during the COVID-19 pandemic
  • Evidence synthesis summary formats for clinical guideline development group members: a mixed-methods systematic review protocol [version 1; peer review: 1 approved with reservations]
  • Irish Media Coverage of COVID-19 Evidence-Based Research Reports From One National Agency
  • Evidence synthesis summary formats for clinical guideline development group members: a mixed-methods systematic review protocol [version 1; peer review: 1 approved, 1 approved with reservations]
  • Evidence synthesis summary formats for clinical guideline development group members: a mixed-methods systematic review protocol
  • The effectiveness and acceptability of evidence synthesis summary formats for clinical guideline development groups: A mixed-methods systematic review
  • Reporting of health equity considerations in equity-relevant observational studies: Protocol for a systematic assessment [version 1; peer review: awaiting peer review]
  • Using the STROBE statement: survey findings emphasized the role of journals in enforcing reporting guidelines
  • Media coverage of evidence outputs during the COVID-19 pandemic: findings from one national agency
  • Improving Social Justice in COVID-19 Health Research: Interim Guidelines for Reporting Health Equity in Observational Studies
  • Journal endorsement of STROBE and its extensions: a cross-sectional bibliometric survey
  • Online survey about the STROBE statement highlighted diverging views about its content, purpose, and value
  • The effectiveness and acceptability of evidence synthesis summary formats for clinical guideline development groups: a mixed-methods systematic review
  • Reporting guidelines used varying methodology to develop recommendations.
  • Investigating how the GRADE Evidence to Decision (EtD) framework is used in Clinical Guidelines: a scoping review protocol [version 1; peer review: awaiting peer review]
  • Lessons learnt from the COVID-19 pandemic in selected countries to inform strengthening of public health systems: a qualitative study

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Co-workers & collaborators

Barbara Clyne

Barbara Clyne

Susan Smith

Susan Smith

Melissa Sharp's public data